Fluid art painting of green, yellow, purple, pink, blue and white colors in abstract form.
Inspiration Fanatic

Healing Art to Express Your Intuition

For today’s #InspirationFanatic Friday, I will be sharing a few styles of creative work and art designs that I believe can lend themselves well to allowing inner voices, perhaps those to which you don’t often listen, to come forth and make their mark on the world. I will pay particular attention to the appeal of these methods for trauma survivors as well as those who may have difficulties with fine-motor skills.

Intuitive Painting

Creative Revolution: Personal Transformation through Brave Intuitive Painting has been instrumental in assisting me in learning how to paint using my gut and heart more than my head. I used it to make self-affirmation cards to increase my practice of compassion. As I worked on creating the cards, I was awed at the internal connection I felt in painting layer after layer, without a strong need to know beforehand the form the final product would take. The desire many trauma survivors have for control is rooted in seeking safety, but little experiences of loosening boundaries within safe contexts in which we can release a need for control can be very healing. It allows us to let the painting take form and “speak” to us about what to do next, instead of working from a preconceive plan.

Going with the Flow

Fluid art is a medium of art in which I have recently begun to dabble. I made inkblots as a demonstration of psychoanalytic technique in psychology years ago using Bombay Inks and love how easy it was to work with ink. Alcohol inks produce a watercolor-like effect. I find something very feminine in the form this takes.

Fluid art can also involve diluting acrylic paints with pouring medium; this is the technique I used for the photograph that accompanies this blog post. A few tips about this style of painting from a beginner:

  • If your canvas is small enough, consider using puppy pee pads to soak up the excess paint that falls off the canvas. Weird but effective!
  • If you would like to use the minimum amount of supplies (the pouring medium is very expensive), you can move the canvas around to spread the paint after pouring it on it. Please comment if you have a cheaper substitute to pouring medium!
  • Recycle condiment bottles to allow you to drip and make shapes with the paint.
  • The canvas must be elevated from the cloth or pad underneath of it or it will end up glued to it (don’t ask me how I know this!). I turned bowls upside down and rested the canvas on them, leaving the edges free. Once you pour the paint and get things how you like them, you cannot move the canvas at all or it will “jar” the paint because it has been thinned.

Fluid art, at least with the pouring acrylic paint method, is friendly to people with limited fine-motor skills. No paintbrushes are needed and, if the area is set up thoughtfully ahead of time, a canvas can be completed very quickly. It is a playful way of engaging with color and shape that can appeal to people across a wide range of ages and skill-sets.

Circular Patterns

Labyrinths, mandalas and circles all have strong resonance in Goddess Spirituality. These can be drawn, painted, or created out of all sorts of mediums. Mixing patterns with carefully placed objects speaks to me of the holding Goddess provides for us and the many, many circles and spheres in and through which Nature envelopes us. I added a bit of a spiral and circle pattern to the included artwork to draw it together.

Each style of artwork which I’ve described is accessible to beginners (I know because I’m one!) and can produce visually interested creations that reflect inner truths. What would our lives look like if we took a tough moment during our day, and made a pattern to represent it? Or painted a layer for each feeling we carried but didn’t share throughout the week? To move beyond coping and stress relief, what would it look like if you sat in front of a blank canvas and asked the loneliness and the hurt and the fearful within you to dare to show of themselves by color and splash? I hope you’ll share the results if you open to this potential moment of magic!

Inspiration Fanatic

Physical Reminders of Inner Worth

Have you ever wanted to spend more time being creative and engaging in self-care? Perhaps you purchased the materials you’d need to do so, and then promptly left them sitting untouched for months. For today’s #InspirationFanatic Friday, I’ll be sharing a practice which has helped me in making time for myself and for imaginative workings. By engaging in this act, I am reminded on a daily basis that it is my privilege and responsibility to care for myself. Doing so helps me believe I am worthy of attention and that I am capable of generating inspiration for myself and others.

I wrote a while back regarding premenstrual symptoms and healing; I chose to make my monthly moon-time the focus of my toolbox. It’s possible to order a subscription box for your period, but I instead created my own self-care focused kit for each month. After purchasing the items I wanted, I dug deeper and was surprised by how well the kit dovetails with my work on my personal vision this year. I made 12 bags in total, one for each month of the year to be opened during my “moon-time.” I keep the kit accessible and in use throughout the entire month as a self-care practice.

The concept of a physical reminder that you are invested in your relationship with yourself does not need to be limited to menstrual cycles. I can see applications to creating supplies for dealing with triggers, celebrating each new moon or welcoming each season. I do think it is important that they be tangible items rather than virtual materials. As the digital age has advanced, many of us find that we’ve lessened our connection to the physical world. I would say that a large aspect of my spiritual life is simply living in the touchable reality which surrounds me. I have found tremendous wisdom and creativity in the connections I make online, but they only penetrate my life to the extent to which I make them real and visible on a regular basis. In this way, the bags I created invite me to pause and connect with not only my body, but also my inner creativity and vitality.

Suggested Contents

Body-Centered Items

  • Treats: I added a small snack which worked great until I got a massive sugar craving and raided all the remaining bags! Next year I plan to include a small gift card for each month, which will at least require me to drive somewhere if I want to “cheat.”
  • Spa Products: I included a bath bomb, candle, face mask, nail polish, emery board and lip gloss for each month. I did not find myself using these as much as I thought I would, I think in part because they didn’t have a “homemade” feel to them and became repetitive. For next year’s kit, I plan to include a personally-crafted candle with essential oils and herbs, handmade bath bombs and perhaps soap or another product that I’ll teach myself to make.

Creativity Supplies

I did not include anything more than a crayon in this year’s bags, but I think there is a limitless number of possibilities here from which I’ll choose in the future. I included one crayon each month but found myself feeling stifled by the lack of choice in colors. If you decide you want a creativity piece to your kit, I would suggest picking one medium per month or one mini project for which you include all the supplies. A few ideas:

  • Drawing/coloring/painting (Perhaps with a specific prompt and tiny canvas for each)
  • Clay (if you can ensure it won’t dry out over the course of the year)
  • Crafting projects such as jewelry or altar items

Inner Work Gear

  • Mini journals with journal prompts
  • Quotes from favorite authors
  • Sentences from your vision statement with intentions for the month
  • Cards with an invitation to develop a specific aspect of your character
  • Stones and crystals that you find healing

Action-Focused Cards

I wrote out a targeted action on which I would like to focus my attention. For instance, this month’s involves reading a chapter in a book. Each of my ideas relates to self-care in a way, but also incorporates other important goals I have such as social engagement, life-long learning and caring for nature.

As I’ve used these kits for several months, I’ve been surprised by the amount of creativity they have generated. For instance, the invitation to focus on a specific character trait has led me to write a poem dedicated to each once a month. For my soon-to-launch Summer Self-Compassion Camp, I will be including a post on painting intuitive self-affirmation cards; I cannot wait to include these in my tools next year. I acknowledge that there was a monetary investment on my part that may not be accessible to everyone; the ironic part of the experience has been that the simple statements, questions and prompts that I wrote out have been the most rewarding and interesting part of the process for me. Even if you have limited funds, taking time to arrange a specific encounter with the Divine and your Inner Wisdom each month is energy well-spent!

If you were to create a series of kits for yourself, what would be the focus? What balance of body-centered, creative and inner work initiatives feels right for you? Where might you place the contents of kit in order to have it serve as a daily touchstone of self-care and connection to Deity?

Inspiration Fanatic

Five Favorite Goddess Spirituality-Themed Tarot and Oracle Cards

For today’s #InspirationFanatic Friday, I decided to review five of my favorite sets of guidance cards (in no particular order) that I find to be relevant to Goddess spirituality. I chose to cover this topic in regards to inspiration as the artwork in particular in these decks is very meaningful and fuels my creativity. Not only do these cards feel affirming to me from a Goddess spirituality perspective, I also find the cards themselves and the guidebooks with which they come to be supportive to me as a trauma survivor. Sometimes the messages are difficult to hear, but I do not find myself triggered by them on a regular basis. The impact they have on me feels at its most intense like a gentle nudge instead of a shove or a harsh word. This reaction could of course vary from person to person.

I am not a professional tarot reader nor do I claim to have particular skill or insight into interpreting cards. For me, the use of such cards is primarily as a means of inner work, not as a way to divine the future. I tend to ask specific questions of Goddess before I pull cards and often journal about my interpretations.

My list is limited to the cards I’ve personally purchased, so I am very eager to hear your recommendations for additional resources. I do not have an affiliate relationship with any of the creators, so my insights are not unduly influenced. I’ve also included a list at the end of my post of cards I hope to soon add to my collection.

  • Womenrunes: The runes on these cards were originally created by Shekhinah Mountainwater and revived by Molly Remer. They are easy to draw and can be combined to provide personalized messages. I’ve inscribed an entire set of them on river stone and a few on my arm! The guidebook is poetic in nature, leaving a lot of room for intuitive interpretation.
  • Soulful Woman Guidance Cards: This deck speaks to me on a regular basis and is one of my “go-to” choices. Part of the reason is that I sometimes dislike having to thumb through a small guidebook in order to figure out what each card means. With this deck, I am able to gain insight quickly as there is both a theme and an affirmation printed directly on the card. The artwork feels accessible and I find the insight I gain from using this deck to be motivational.
  • Sacred Rebels Oracle: These oracle cards contain some of my favorite artwork. The creators of the deck included art from women from across the globe. Each time I draw a card anew, I realize there was something in the image I missed the first time through. The guidebook has plenty of description of how to grow from the meaning of the card without being too prescriptive. I do notice a thread of the “law of attraction” peeking through at moments, of which I am not a fan, but the overall message is positive and uplifting.
  • The Good Tarot: The imagery of this deck is ethereal and soft to me. There are aspects of traditional tarot, but the focus is more on affirming where a person is in the present day instead of forecasting future developments. Additionally, the four elements are represented which I find helps me connect to the meaning of the cards more fully than cups, swords, etc. The guidebook is pretty sparse with a summary paragraph or a few sentences for each card; this is my personal preference as I like to intuit meaning rather than feeling like I’m being restricted by an overly descriptive narration.
  • The Goddess Oracle: I find this deck to be particularly useful when I’m feeling in need of the presence of Goddess in my life. The guidebook to each card invites the reader on an inner journey in which the person communes with the Goddess. I found the writing to be a bit formulaic in its approach here and would have liked a bit more background on the historic and cultural significance of each Goddess. The artwork is beautiful and inviting.

On my wish-list:

  • Celtic Goddess Oracle Cards: I am a huge fan of Judith Shaw’s artwork and writing. There is an elegance and warmth that exudes from her paintings, and in the descriptions she’s shared of her artwork, I can see the thought and research that has gone into her creations. I can’t wait to purchase this 35-card deck!
  • Infuse Your Life with Joy and Delight Inspirational Card Deck: I’ve been following Illisa Millermoon on Instagram for a while, and I find her joy to be contagious! She shares about her daily life, including her Sparkle Quests, and her creative process, and I can see the energy that’s been poured into this 52-card deck (as well as all the beautiful colors!). Can’t wait to have it for myself.

What are your favorite oracle or tarot cards, and why do you prefer them? To what extent do you include decks that “challenge” you in your work? How do you conceptualize your use of the cards? Is it a conversation with Source, divination of the future, inner work, or another process? Do you see the cards themselves as a spiritual entity and/or a conduit through which you can act in relationship with Deity?

Inspiration Fanatic

Macrame Crystal Baskets

For today’s #InspirationFanatic Friday, I want to share ideas for ways to create and use macrame baskets, woven with string, to hold crystals, stones or other precious objects. I learned how to create the baskets using this Youtube tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXlU1xvRkmw I found it easy to follow so I thought I’d share directly.

Tips For Use with Crystals

  • As you create the basket, place the crystal in it several times in order to get the spacing of the knots to be correct.
  • Use thicker string to start with as it is easier to see what you are doing and to redo if needed.
  • Remember you are working in 3-D, so pull the basket into an upside-down cone shape as you work. I had very uneven knots the first time because I was laying it flat.

Creative Uses of Macrame Crystal Baskets

I really enjoyed this project, in part because it was very easy to master. I love the temporary nature of it as well. The basket can be taken apart without damage and reused for another crystal or stone. You can use your favorite crystal from your altar for a season and then return it to its original purpose.

A few specific ideas:

  • Jewelry such as necklaces and bracelets
  • Ornaments for your Yule tree or doorway
  • A way to carry a special rune with you
  • If you go small, a keychain or purse decoration

I am planning to add sophistication to my baskets with additional smaller stones and embellishments. How have you or could you see putting these fun creations in to use?

Inspiration Fanatic

Crafty Coasters for Ritual Use

For today’s #InspirationFanatic Friday, I wanted to provide instructions for a simple and affordable craft you can add to your altar or use during ritual.

Supplies

Beads and embellishments

Needle and thread

Cork coasters

Hot glue gun and glue sticks

Ribbon or twine

Instructions

step-1.jpg
1. Sew the beads and embellishments onto the cork coaster.
step 2.JPG
2. Apply hot glue to the back of the coaster and adhere another coaster to it.
step-3.jpg
3. Apply hot glue around the edges of the sandwiched coasters, and adhere ribbon or twine to the circumference.
step 4
4. Cover the place where the ribbon or twine meets with an embellishment.
step 5
Step 5: Enjoy your coaster for use during ceremonies and/or as a part of your altar!